Ethnographic method: the anthropologist’s strategy in the field Research in cultural anthropology

  • Yas Al-Abbasi

Abstract

The concept of ethnography (in general) refers to the model of describing a human culture – its values, traditions, norms, institutions, interpersonal behaviors, material productions, and beliefs- by many of tools or methods such as interviewing, participant observation, and personal documents. The aim of research to explain the scope of ethnography in human sciences (one of them anthropology) and the importance is explain the steps which be used from researcher especially anthropologist when he inter the filed or fieldwork.   




 

References

1. Agar, M. H. (1980) the Professional Stranger: An Informal Introduction to Ethnography. Academic Press.
2. Charlotte Aull Davies, (1999) Reflexive Ethnography: A Guide to Researching Selves and Others, First published, Routledge, London.
3. Hammersley, M. and Atkinson, P. (2007) Ethnography: Principles in practice, Third edition, Routledge, New York.
4. Spradley, J.P., (1980) Participant Observation. New York: Holt. Rinehart and Winston.
5. Tony L. Whitehead, (2005) Basic Classical Ethnographic Research Methods, (EICCARS), University of Maryland. College Park, July 17.
6. Tony L. Whitehead, (2002) what is ethnography? Methodological, Ontological, and Epistemological Attributes, (EICCARS), University of Maryland. College Park, July 17,.
7. Wolcott, H. (1999). Ethnography: A Way of Seeing. Oregon: Altamira Press.
8. Wood, P. (1997), ‘Ethnography and Ethnology’, in T. Barfield (ed.), the Dictionary of Anthropology, Malden: Blackwell.
Published
2019-09-01
How to Cite
AL-ABBASI, Yas. Ethnographic method: the anthropologist’s strategy in the field Research in cultural anthropology. Mustansiriyah Journal of Arts (MuJA), [S.l.], v. 43, n. 87, p. 1-10, sep. 2019. ISSN 0258-1086. Available at: <http://amm.uomustansiriyah.edu.iq/index.php/mustansiriyah/article/view/1030>. Date accessed: 22 oct. 2019.
Section
Articles